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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 58 (some duplicates have been removed)
to say the agreements with israel regarding the easing of the blockade and with egypt, are very vague. they're being negotiated today. i mean they're an agreement to, to negotiate things about them. which are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary, they may be very, very limited, and they may never materialize at all what hamas has gained is first of all a certain diplomatic breakthrough. the amir of qatar went there before this happened. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there the foreign minister of durky and foreign minister of tunisia went there. the prime minister of turkey may go. what hamas has been able to do is bring -- >> break out of its diplomatic cage a little bit. that's the benefit. the other thing is that this is a benefit to the people, the hamas factions in gaza who are fighting an internal power struggle with the external leadership that used to be based in damascus and is now disbursed all over the world. i think for different factions in hamas they've achieved things politically for themselves. the people of gaza may be in a sense o
they do. we should distinguish those two. >> with israel and egypt, the blockade is very vague. they are being negotiated today. there's an agreement to negotiate things about them, which are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary. they may be very, very limited and they may never materialize at all. what hamas has gained is, first of all, a certain diplomatic breakthrough. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there, the foreign minister of turkey went there. what hamas has been able to do is -- >> international recognition. >> yeah. break out of its diplomatic cage a bit. that's the benefit. the other thing, this is a benefit to the people, the hamas people in gaza, fighting an internal power with the external leadership that used to be in damascus and is now dispursed all over the place. they achieved things for themselves. the people of gaza maybe in a sense of euphoria, but there's a sense of hangover. there ought to be, as there was, after cass led in 2008 and 2009, a clear contrast with a better situation. today there isn't one. that's the tra
. [ gunfire ] secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister announced the deal in cairo after the secretary spent the day in intense face-to-face talks with the leaders of israel, the palestinian authority and egypt. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership it has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> we're still learning details of the agreement between the israelis and hamas. egypt and the united states apparently have assumed important major roles in keeping the peace and preventing new supplies of rockets from being smuggled into gaza. president obama spoke by phone today with the leaders of both egypt and israel. >> translator: i have agreed with the president that israel and the united states would work together to prevent the smuggling of arms to the terror organizations. the vast majority of which comes from iran. >> throughout this crisis cnn has positioned crews throughout the region including correspondents in egypt and on both sides of the israeli/gaza
in egypt after negotiations break down between president morsi and judicial officials and people are are taking to the streets. >>> lawmakers back to work in the u.s. priority number one, avoiding the fiscal cliff. the left and right are talking compromi compromise. and the u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, headed to c p capitol hill to meet with her most outspoken critics, answer questions about what happened in benghazi. benghazi. let's go "outfront." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good evening. "outfront" tonight, egypt on edge. is a new dictatorship on the horizon? tonight, president morsi clarified, but really largely stood by his decision to grant himself sweeping powers. including freedom from judicial review for what he's calling presidential decisions. the announcement was made today after morsi met with members of egypt's judicial body, which has been very critical of his position and u.s. officials who were praising the new leader for his role in negotiating a cease fire between israel and hamas, well now when he took all these powers away from judge
now. egypt is the main broker. egypt is also in contact with the united states. also, there is turkey's involvement, qatar's involvement, the head of the hamas political wing is also involved. in temz of creating with israel, egypt is the main broker. we understand it has not been confirmed for us that an israeli envoy is at the table or at least has been and is involved in these talks, but the impression we're getting from the israeli side is that they're obviously involved in the negotiations and each side is looking very closely at what the other is proposing. has each side sent enough of a message that they can say, okay, this is it. we've sent our message. we want this and that, and now is the time to get off the military ramp? we'll see. >> you've covered this. when you take a look at this situation on the ground and you realize the israeli government is calling up 75,000 reservists, massing tens of thousands of troops and tanks near the border at the palestinian territory, what does this say to you in terms of a ground invasion? does it seem inevitable? what do you make of what
, and the coup in egypt, the president seemingly in search of a campaign. after a long holiday weekend, does anyone remember been gauzy? to find out, we are joined by of and the daily column founder and editor cockies contributor. thank you. let's start with republican party. is that too strong a word? in disarray. >> i think disarray is a little strong right now. we will see. it is one thing to talk about these issues so far in advance. in terms of the norquist tax pledge and certainly the susan rice, these are noises that you made to sound conciliatory after an election, and we think back to 2009. the republicans sounded very conciliatory in the days after president obama's reelection when he was holding a high approval rating, but by april or may of his first year that that had melted away. so right now is happy talk from the republicans. we will see whether that materializes into votes. lou: such happy talk, why aren't there more smiling faces in the republican party? >> pretty unhappy talk from what i can tell, and to this point pretty frivolous. you see members of the united states sen
for example in egypt the brotherhood may be very reluctant on certain aspects of the security sector they're dealing with the military privileges of the military but other areas, for example, police, basic police reform and abuses and behavior of police i think my question and the brotherhood would be happy to see this corrected and improved, but that there is a perception within the brotherhood by many in the egyptian government institutions that if you were to address these issues it would result in its short term increase in crime and stability and they feel as though they can either fight crime effectively where they could address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need
the crisis in egypt or push that country into further chaos. that is one of our big stories. we're glad you're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon:. i'm jon scott. the first elected leader, president mohammed morsi expected to come face-to-face with senior judges in egypt who say his power grab has gone too far. there are indications that the both side are trying to find some middle ground. morsi's maneuver unleased a rage of protests that continues to rage across the country. meanwhile the u.s. embassy in cairo says there are sporadic clashes between protesters and police near its entrance. we're told some rocks landed inside the walls of that huge compound. embassy officials say there is no indication they are the target. egypt wields enormous influence in the middle east peac process. that power demonstrated by brokering the cease-fire between is rainfall and hamas. steve care began streaming live too cairo with the latest developments right now. steve? >> reporter: jon, this is a key meeting between egypt's president and the chief justices in cairo. already there are hints from the president's
's tahrir square and elsewhere in egypt today, sparked when president mohamed morsi granted himself broad new powers. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the widespread demonstrations, and assess what's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten
" tonight, egypt on edge. is a new dictatorship on the horizon? tonight, president morsi clarified, but really largely stood by his decision to grant himself sweeping powers. including freedom from judicial review for what he's calling presidential decisions. the announcement was made today after morsi met with members of egypt's judicial body, which has been very critical of his decision. and u.s. officials who just days ago were heaping praise on the new egyptian leader for his role in initiating a cease-fire between israel and hamas, well, now when he took all these powers away from judges that reign supreme, they're in a tough spot. >> we have some concerns about the decisions and declarations announced on november 22nd. democracy depends on strong institutions and the important checks and balances that provide accountability. >> so, today, there were nationwide protests continuing in egypt and a million person march of anti morsi protesters is scheduled for tomorrow in tahrir square. the very spot where the revolution that cleared the way for morsi's presidency was born. now,
need to help the libyans train a national army. they were willing to pay for it. in egypt we really led from behind. this idea of having a hands off policy toward syria is about to blochb the whole region up. the war is coming to israel. it's affecting turkey and other places. so i believe that if they don't lead from the front that syria and iran are going to coming together and we're going to have a major conflict in the mideast. >> what was the best thing we got out the arab spring so far? >> the fact is authoritarian regimes have been overthrown the likelihood they will simply be replaced by other authoritarian regimes or some in some cases, yemen and libya qualify here the countries will descend into anarchy. parts will be controlled by al-qaeda and quote, unquote, success of the government controls very little territory. i think overall the arab spring has not brought democracy and light to middle east. it has brought a deterioration of the security situation and deterioration of the american interests and those of our friends and allies like israel and arab states. >> greta: ther
a plea to allies of the palestinians in particular. the president of egypt, the prime minister of turkey said if you would like to see a two-state solution in the near future, a palestinian state next to israel this has to deescalate now. the president expressing this fear if hamas doesn't stop rocket attacks on to israel's soille he fears left unsaid is israel may retaliate and turn in to a ground war and then the idea of a two-state solution in the peace process will be in the way distant future. obviously the middle east peace process has been on hold for quite sometime. he was asked about this trip will include a visit to myanmar which is also known as burma. he was asked whether it was too soon. a lot of human rights violations taken in burma and he wouldn't have gone if aung san suu kyi didn't think it was right for him to go. a few notes to point out. one is during -- before the press conference he and secretary clinton were visiting a mondastermonastery. they were joking about getting prayers over the fiscal cliff. the president at the press conference was asked what about what k
in tahrir square-- familiar scenes in egypt nearly two years ago that led to the fall of longtime leader hosni mubark. but today, they were aimed at egypt's new leader. in the coastal city of alexandria, opponents set fire to the offices of president mohammed morsi's political party, the muslim brotherhood. there and elsewhere in egypt today, the president's critics and supporters clashed in the streets over his decree yesterday exempting himself from judicial review, and giving him authority to take steps against "threats to the revolution." morsi, egypt's first freely elected president, took office in june. in recent days, he'd garnered worldwide praise for mediating a cease-fire between israel and hamas. today, he told a supportive crowd outside the presidential palace in cairo that granting himself sweeping powers was necessary to prevent figures from the old regime from halting progress. >> ( translated ): i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone-- to go against anyone is something that i could never be associated with-- or announcing that i am biased towards anyone. howe
the situation in egypt. the cease-fire in gaza. and, the libya investigation, as we sit down with senator john mccain. it is a fox news sunday exclusive. >>> then, with the loom fiscal cliff, is it casting a shadow over shoppers and investors this holiday season? visions of bargains are dancing inned the of consumers but will the possibility of higher tax slow them down? we'll talk with matthew shay of the national retail federation and john sweeney of fidelity investments. plus the holiday is over and the white house and congressional leaders try to make a deal. we'll ask our sunday panel if negotiators can reach a compromise to avoid the fiscal cliff. and a thanksgiving tradition, our power player of the week has me dancing with turkeys. all, right now, on fox news sunday. ♪ >> chris: and, hello again, from fox news in washington. on this holiday weekend, we are watching several major foreign policy developments from egypt, to gaza. to the continuing controversy over the benghazi attacks. here to talk about it all is senator john mccain, and, senator, welcome back to fox news sunday. >> th
deduction. dean reynolds will tell us more about this later in the broadcast. that crisis in egypt is growing tonight. more than 200,000 protesters have filled cairo's tahrir square. they are angry with their new president, mohamed morsi who said last week that his decisions cannot be challenged by the courts which gives him almost absolute power. and our holly williams is above tahrir square in cairo this evening. holly, what's going on in the crowd behind you now? >> reporter: scott, we are seeing scenes reminisce september of the egyptian revolution. tahrir square was once again carpeted in people today, tens of thousands of people who poured in from every direction and they were chanting the same slogan that they chanted during the revolution. the people want the downfall of the regime. i was out on this square earlier today talking to people. some people are saying that they won't leave the streets until president morsi rescinds the decrees that have given him sweeping new powers. we've seen very low-level violence here in cairo, but in several other cities there have been vio
in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since
're in "the situation room." >>> tensions heading toward a tipping point in egypt where thousands of mourners today marched through cairo's tahrir square for the funeral of a man killed in protest against the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judici
. and if the diplomats, i know that ban ki-moon, the u.s. secretary general is on his way to egypt and israel. he's trying to get something going. i know representatives from all these other countries that have relations with hamas like e kwijipt and qatar and turkey, they're trying to get something going. there's intense efforts behind the scenes. i don't know if they're going to result in anything. i was asked yesterday what i thought the chances of a serious-fire were. i thought yesterday about 50/50. i haven't been able to talk with anybody in a position of authority here in israel. i've been here in the southern part along the border not far from the -- from gaza. but it doesn't look very promising. let's see if the diplomats can get something going. you point out that the feelings on both sides seem to be intensifying in a bad way. and i think that's right. >> senator john mccain came out and said, you know, we should send bill clinton in. he should be the mediator in this latest conflict. would israel or gaza welcome bill clinton? >> reporter: i've been saying that, actually, myself. i wro
a lot right now, and that is egypt that's taking a very firm stance, calling this an israeli aggression. but one of the interesting things that tony blair, the former british prime minister said, he said of course, right now everybody is on the phone, everybody is trying to negotiate, everybody is trying to bring the violence to an end. but at this point in time it certainly looks very much as though things are escalating rather than deescalating and that is certainly the message that we are getting from the israeli defense forces. >> fred pleitgen, thank you very much indeed. >>> joining me is the israeli ambassador to the u.n. welcome to you, sir. >> thank you. good evening. >> this is a dangerous situation, isn't it. what is your reading of what is happening on the ground? we're hearing tonight of 2,000 troops being moved, israeli troops, maybe 30,000 others being brought up as well. what are you hearing and what is the plan? >> well, i won't get into military operations but it has to be very, very clear. israel and israel's government will do anything it takes to protect its citizen
's no trust between their history. something of a test period to s see. it's currently negotiated in egypt right now with egypt continuing. the next phase is going to be whether or not the various restrictions on movements across the border. the israelis have said they will consider that. not entirely. # this is very much a first step at this point in time. >> thanks so much. fred, what's the situation there right now? >> reporter: well, the people here are also quite happy that there's no many rockets raining down on them. what you're not going to be seeing here on the israeli side is celebration. that's because people believe that hamas will regroup and fire rockets at israel again. here is what some people told me today. after a week long military operation and rocket barrages fired from gaza you were they're trying to get back to normal. in the town that suffered through so many air raid alarms this is the first time he can take his kid shopping without fear. >> you feel like you're back to life. >> reporter: you won't see people celebrating the cease-fire here. many saying it's did ac
break out in egypt as police fired teargas into the crowds. here are some of those scenes. >> unbelievable. more than 100,000 people flooded into downtown cairo. this time they are protesting the current president martha maccallum and his power grab. they are disillusioned with what he has brought to their country. then you have this happening. police firing teargas. gypt's highest courts refusing to work in protest of morsi's actions. steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo. the protests looked like the unrest we saw in that same square back in 2009 and the arab spring and the overthrow of mubarak. how dangerous is it? is it more dangerous now? >> this certainly allows similarities between what we saw last night and those demonstrations that overthrew mubarak. hundreds of thousands of people are energized. many of them want this president out. but a couple of important differences. the current president martha maccallum was elected by 52% of the vote just five months ap a - the current president mohamed morsi haas elected by 52% of the vote. martha: it was a close ele
we should be thankful for when it comes to the political world. and egypt's muslim brotherhood. the cease-fire deal betweend evf israel and hamas. we have that coming up next. with wholesome noodles and bite sized chicken, nothing brings you together like chicken noodle soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >> more breaking news and developing stories on a brand-new hour on "happening now." >> a new holiday spending bonanza. americans are feeling more confident about our economy. will lead to the great of growth, and what could set us back? >> also, an arrest in a string of murders in new york city connected to one gunman. what we are learning about the man that police in new york city say was poised to strike again. and a large bird crashes through the cockpit plane of this airport. details of the scare in the air for the pilot and passengers. it's all "happening now." >> but first, the cease-fire truce may be fragile, but it appeals to be holding. i am heather childers in for jenna lee. >> and i am rick scott in for jon scott. with egypt's president mohammed mo
as rockets continue to fill the air over israel and gaza and a planned cease fire, visit to gaza by egypt's prime minister may not be holding up. senior international correspondent sarah sidner is in the middle of it all. she has more for you from gaza city. >> reporter: what is happening on both sides of the gaza/israel border looks and feels like war to anyone who has to live with it, no matter what the governments on either side have declared. this is a small taste of what it fe felt like in gauza over a 24-hor period. >> that is exactly -- all right. i'm going to move out of the way and let you get a look here. i'm going to let you get a lock at what is going on. i can see the black smoke. it's difficult to capture on camera. you saw that flash. this is what we have been dealing with all day. we've also been dealing with -- i'm sorry, the power has just gone out. we have been dealing with power outages, wolf. this feels like war. it may not have been declared, but it feels like war to the civilians who live here. >> the booms and smoke from targeted air strikes from morning till night
is on board. >> gregg: and christmas in egypt. a christians in egypt have a new leader. we have a video of the elaborate ceremony. >> heather: and weeks after super storm sandy how is lower manhattan recovering from the devastation. anna is there and has the answer for us. >> reporter: the cleanup continues, many businesses and residential towers are using generators for power and pumps to get the water out. some have not reopened yet. we will hear from a business owner and community leader after this break. [ mother ] you can't leave the table till you finish your vegetables. [ clock ticking ] [ male announcer ] there's a better way... v8 v-fusion. vegetable nutrition they need, fruit taste they love. could've had a v8. or...try kids boxes! ♪ [ male announcer ] they are a glowing example of what it means to be the best. and at this special time of year, they shine even brighter. come to the winter event and get the mercedes-benz you've always wished for, now for an exceptional price. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer lease a 2013 glk350 for $399 a month at your local mercede
with us. who was the strongest player in that whole period? it was egypt. egypt was strong because egypt has peace with israel. the way to be strong is not by making war and unilateral declarations in the u.n. that have no meaning. the way to gain strength is to be a partner. >> is the cease-fire holding? >> cease-fire's holding so far. >> and you thank egypt's president mohamed morsi for that? >> he is so far now proving to be a constructive partner certainly as proven in this last operation. >> is he honoring the peace treaty with israel? >> i think there's peace between egypt and israel on a daily basis, yes. >> what about syria? what would you like to see the government of israel as far as syria is concerned? because it's intense what's going on right now. about 40,000 people have been killed over the past year and a half. >> it's horrible. it's a terrible tragedy. we, the people of israel, look at the people of syria with great respect, even awe standing up and risking and even giving their lives for freedom from the terrible bashar al assad regime. we want them to go. we've long wa
about egypt? could we see this president reached out to the president and talk about what is going on? >> the president, as you know, has broken no on numerous occasions with president -- has occasions mn numerous with numerousoris. -- with president morsi going forward. i do not have an agenda on what those conversations with look- alike. we have raised concerns. the state department put out a statement on this about the briefing. the state department have more information of this of a client how he has communicated those concerns. our interest is in the process, the transition to a democracy continuing in the development of a government that reflects the will of the egyptian people. we are working towards that. we believe it is in the interest of the american people and of the united states but also because it reflects the will and the interest of the egyptian people. >> democracy is in the process, but doesn't look like there is a transitioning to a dictatorship? >> important to take a step back. in november 2012, lookout -- look at how much has changed in that region of since late
. >> this is just an example. there are women all over the middle eave, yemen, tuknees yark egypt, they are using social media to show what is really going on there. so try to help mobilize others and to get attention to what the plight of women is. it is absolutely inappropriate that it could be taken down. i think it's back up now. >> greta: it is back up and facebook has apologized. but it ising about that the knee-jerk reaction to remove this picture because there were people where she was living that objected to an unveiled woman. they didn't want that on the facebook page. >> doesn't surprise me, having been in the middle east and saudi arabia and afghanistan and all sorts of places in africa, doesn't surprise me. but very disturbing that facebook would be willing to take it down. >> greta: it's hard to imaginer here, the education, women couldn't get educated. a 14-year-old pakistani girl was hotted in head for confronting pakistan on education. >> the war on women, women who are honor killed after they were raped. they can't go to school, leave their house, travel. this is when we should
this before. the government in egypt shut down the internet last year during the revolution there that toppled mubarak. same thing with government in libya. in the months before rebel fighters took down that regime and ousted and then killed gadhafi. sometimes governments have also blocked access to the internet in smaller, more directed ways like pakistan and bangladesh turning off youtube this year on account of that insane islamophobic video that sparked protests across the muslim world. just this week the government in tajikistan turned off facebook after people started posting mean things on facebook about the president of tajikistan who apparently is a wuss. pakistan, they blocked twitter for a day because of a, quote, blasphemous cartoon contest. this kind of thing happens. government shuts off parts of the internet or the whole darn thing. because this is a thing governments do to their people, preserving access to the internet and means of communication that the internet affords us, that has become a significant part of the way the u.s. interacts with other countries. it's become a si
there are major developments to tell you about in egypt. new protests breaking out after egyptian president mohammed morsi announced far-reaching powers placing himself above any government law. that has sparked the violent clashes that he see here on the streets and dozens of protests but the country's justice minister now saying there is some sort of resolution on all of this imminent. steve harrigan joins us now streaming live from cairo with the latest. steve, do you think that we could see some kind of compromise today on this? >> reporter: martha, we are certainly hearing sound from the presidential teamsh to reace opposition in a push for a possible compromise. what we're likely to see in the next 90 minutes here is a meeting between egypt's president and some top judges here inside cairo. judges across the country have gone on strike. they say the president tried to put himself above the law. we could see some scaling back from a presidential team that has been surprised by the angry reaction to the move by president morsi, martha. martha: such a key moment for the future of egypt.
and israel exchanged rocket and shell fire. in november 13, is real and hamas said messages via egypt indicating interest in a truce, but then it degraded from there. at the question is whether egypt can play a role, or the united states which has sent hillary clinton, can play a role. the israelis debate a ground invasion of your reporting from gaza city, the olive orchards, they lied to enter the border. monday the area was a virtual no mans land. hundreds of families have fled. it says that gazana are not the only ones encouraged about a ground invasion. talks in cairo, continue in cairo. let us hear from on next call, terry in maryland, on our line for republicans. caller: america has no real influence in the middle east. i say that because we have been trying to negotiate this cents ronald reagan. and if we had any influence with the arab-speaking population, we basically would have succeeded by now. the reality is, for half of the countries, we are nothing more than ana tm, and the other half, -- we are nothing more nothingan atm and for the others we are nothing more than an an
.s. embassy in egypt is now shut down. violence between protesters and police has blocked roads around the compound in central cairo. the protesters, they are actually not targeting the embassy. they have been demonstrating, however, for a week. there has been some fighting with riot police around tahrir square. they've got rocks, tear gas being hurled in the streets. demonstrators, they are trying to force president mohammed morsi to give back some of the sweeping powers that he seized earlier in the week. want to go live to cairo. reza sayah is overlooking tahrir square. is it calm where you are, and are people assuming that things are going to get better? there are a lot of critics who vague the broum brotherhood is really now trying to hijack the process, hijack the constitution and get the president to remain in power, as much power as he can hold on to. >> yeah. many of those critics, suzanne, are behind us. still demonstrating here in tahrir square. in the meantime, major developments unfolding. as we speak right now, egypt's constitutional assembly is voting to approve a draft
to egypt hoping the leaders can solve the mess. >> the egyptian have an interest in the region not exploding. they will have to take serious steps to make it clear to hamas they will lose support. >> egypt watch what you do and how you do it. you are teetering with the congress of having aid cut off if you continue to incite violence. >> brian: what about the arab democracy? our next guest is a former cia agent with the unit. michael, another conflict between the israelis and palestinians. and the center piece is gaza. what is different now? >> what is different now, america had invested in 50 years in tyranny to make sure israel was suppressed and the america protected. when arab spring came. people including senator graham predicted just a secular democracy and it was a arab spring of secularism. people will turn in a time of turmoil to their faith or what they believed in for a thousand years. we have governments in libya where our people were killed and now in egypt that are going to support their breathern. >> brian: what is the best conclusion and best way to end. >> i am
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 58 (some duplicates have been removed)